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Places to Look for a Job in Audio Production

Places to Look for a Job in Audio Production

If you’re currently studying audio engineering and music production, your search for a job in audio production shouldn’t wait until after graduation. You can start networking and researching now—and the sooner the better. The paradox here is that while your training in audio production will actually qualify you for a wide range of positions, the reality is that the industry is competitive and relationship-driven, and cold-call resumes rarely work, no matter how qualified you are. While you’re studying, you need to be making the connections now that you’ll need in order to get hired later.

Types of Jobs You Can Look For

Your news audio production skills will qualify you for a broad range of jobs and career positions, and you can narrow the search based on your interests and passions. Here are just a few examples of jobs and careers you might look for:

  • Audio engineer/audio engineering assistant. You can either try to land a job in a recording studio, or if you’re the entrepreneurial type, start a studio of your own.
  • Live audio engineer. You can look for an audio production job in one of many live music venues, or if you like to travel, try to get hired with a touring act.
  • Music producer. You may want to dive into the creative and/or administrative side of recording, and start producing recordings for musical artists you believe in.
  • Video production-audio department. Films, videos, TV commercials and web series almost always need audio production help.
  • Post-production expert. Post-production houses handle a lot of interesting projects, including voiceover, audio FX, foley and ADR for film/TV.
  • Mastering engineer. You might choose to specialize in mastering, which is the all-important final step in preparing recorded audio for CD and vinyl duplication, as well as making music and other audio “broadcast ready.”

Strategies For Landing a Job In Audio Production

As we said earlier, finding a good audio production job is probably going to take more than just mailing out a bunch of resumes to companies that don’t know anything about you. Here are a few things you can do be a bit more strategic in your search for a job.

LEVERAGE YOUR CONNECTIONS

Getting “inside” the industry is a huge step in being considered for any audio production job, so look for ways to connect wherever you can. If you’re a Recording Connection student apprenticing in a recording studio, you’re already halfway there. Your mentor and the Student Services Department will be huge resources to help make introductions and recommend you to potential employers (you might even get hired by your mentor if you prove yourself). If you need more inroads, try to get in the door of a recording studio through an internship, or even offering to volunteer to gain work experience.

ESTABLISH AN ONLINE PRESENCE

These days, having an online presence helps to make you look legitimate. It also helps extend your base of connections beyond the people you can simply meet in person. Setting up a website and a presence on social media (e.g., Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Google+) will make it easy for prospective employers to find useful information about you and your accomplishments when they “Google” you (and trust us, they will “Google” you).

TARGET YOUR JOB SEARCH

To save time and energy, focus your job search on the type of work you want to be doing (see the list above), as well as the locations where those jobs are most likely to be. If you want to work in country music, for example, you should be searching for companies in Nashville; if you want to work in film-related audio, look up companies in film hotspots like Los Angeles, New York, Orlando and even Shreveport. Research potential companies where you’d like to work, and learn as much as you can about them. By targeting your job search to the places and types of work that interest you, you’re more likely to land a job in audio production that you’ll love for many years to come.