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Do You Need to Learn Logic Pro to Work In Audio?

If you’re training to become an audio engineer or music producer, you might be familiar with Logic Pro, the digital audio workstation (DAW) that acts as a fully functional recording studio on your computer. Logic is a software program similar to Pro Tools in that it can handle all the basic functions of recording, from capturing audio to signal processing to mixing. The question is, how necessary is it to learn Logic Pro? Or for that matter, would you be better off just learning Pro Tools?

It actually isn’t a question of either/or. Because Pro Tools is considered the industry standard in recording studios, it’s important for any aspiring audio professional to know how to use it. But there are some musicians, producers and audio professionals who use Logic Pro as a matter of personal preference, so depending on your needs, it might be helpful to learn this program in addition to Pro Tools.


Initially, the biggest difference between Logic and Pro Tools was that Logic is designed exclusively for Mac computers, while Pro Tools works with either PC or Mac. However, Logic Pro has been recently redesigned (beginning with Logic Pro X) to include a large on-board library of sounds, effects, and even “virtual drummers” that Pro Tools doesn’t offer, allowing users to record and mix everything “in the box” without additional plug-ins. This has made Logic Pro an especially attractive program for composers, songwriters and electronic musicians who prefer a MIDI environment. And because Logic can also record and mix external audio similarly to Pro Tools, there are many users who see no reason to use Pro Tools at all.

That being said, Logic Pro is still limited to the Mac platform, and Pro Tools is still widely used in most professional recording studios, so up-and-coming audio engineers should still make learning Pro Tools the priority. However, here are some instances in which it would also be wise to learn Logic:

  1. If you prefer Mac to PC. Logic Pro is an Apple-exclusive software, and integrates well with other Apple programs, so if you use Mac exclusively home, for example, you might prefer Logic to Pro Tools.
  2. If you lean toward electronic/MIDI instruments. Again, many electronic musicians seem to lean toward Logic Pro for the reasons mentioned above.
  3. If you work in a recording studio that uses Logic, or if you are trying to get a job in such a studio. It stands to reason that you should learn whatever software programs your studio uses.
  4. If you want to be more versatile as an audio engineer. The more DAWs you are familiar with, the more comfortable you will be in any setting. Also, by learning Logic Pro along with other DAW programs, you’ll have more freedom to choose between programs according to your preferences.

So no, ultimately, you don’t have to learn Logic Pro in order to work in professional audio. However, there are certainly a number of reasons why you might want to learn Logic in addition to Pro Tools. If you’re interested in mastering Logic Pro, the Recording Connection can place you with a mentor who uses it in the studio and who can teach you the ropes.