Apply Now APPLY

Will Recording School Improve My Chances for Success?

01/05/2012

Are you looking for a good recording school to prepare you for a career in professional audio? If so, you might be wondering whether going to recording school will improve your chances for success as an audio engineer or music producer.

Surprisingly, the answer is no. Attending a recording school can give you an education, but it will NOT improve your chances for success. Here are some reasons why this is true:

  1. The music industry has little or no regard for college degrees or diplomas. No matter how prestigious the school you attend, you cannot hope to impress anyone in the music business with your college degree or recording school diploma. The people doing the hiring in this business simply do not care about where you got your education; they only care whether you can do the job well—and that is better proven by real-life experience than any amount of schooling.
  2. Recording schools usually do not give you real-world experience. As we just mentioned, experience is more valuable to the music business than a degree or diploma. Unfortunately, most recording schools train their students in classrooms or studio simulations, which cannot duplicate the dynamics of a real recording studio because the environment is too controlled.
  3. A recording school typically cannot help you make industry connections. Beyond education and experience, this business runs on inside connections—studios tend to hire people they know. Because most recording schools train students in isolation, the students don’t get the chance to make those connections.

Taking these things into account, it is entirely possible to spend tens of thousands of dollars on a recording school education, and be no closer to having a career as an audio engineer or music producer than before you enrolled in school.


So if recording school will not improve your chances for success—what will?


The answer: learning in a real recording studio.


Many successful producers and engineers never got a formal education; instead, they learned the skills by getting into a recording studio and working their way up. Many industry pros still believe this is the best way to learn professional audio. A fresh educational approach called the mentor-apprentice (extern) method has taken its cue from this reality, and is now effectively bridging the gap between recording schools and the recording industry by training students in actual recording studios instead of classrooms. Each student receives one-on-one instruction from a working audio professional in the studio while working on real recording projects. This gives the student the chance to make the inside connections and log real-life experience while getting a practical education, thereby greatly increasing his/her chances for landing a job.


Thus, going to school can only improve your chances for success if the school can help you make connections and gain work experience while you learn. This is why a recording school that uses the mentor-apprentice (extern) approach is definitely worth your consideration.