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LESSON 13: Microphones and Tracking Techniques

A microphone changes acoustic energy into an electric current that can be altered and manipulated. Any device that converts one form of energy into another form of energy is called a transducer. Microphones are typically the first stop in the signal flow of our recording path. In this chapter, we will look at various types of microphones, explain briefly how they work, and help familiarize us with popular mics we will see in the studio.

At the Recording Connection, you’ll gain experience tracking audio in a professional studio; this is experience you will take with you to your home studio, so you can sound a cut above the rest. With your mentor’s years of expertise imparted on you, you’ll internalize the technical process of recording, and unleash this skill when creativity (or a paying gig) strikes.

Objectives

  • Microphones
    • History of Microphones
      • Invention
      • Carbon Mic
      • Condensor Mic
      • Electromagnetic Moving Coil Mic
      • Electromagnetic Ribbon Mic
      • Section Review
    • Microphone Specifications
      • Frequency Response
      • Polar (Pickup) Pattern
      • Signal to Noise Ratio
      • Impedance Rating
      • Maximum SPL Rating
      • Sensitivity
      • Section Review
    • Microphone Circuit Types
      • Carbon Mics
      • Condenser Mics
      • Dynamic Mics
      • Ribbon Mics
      • Section Review
  • Tracking
    • Planning
    • Mic Selection
      • Auditioning Mics
    • Setting Up
      • Input Lists
      • Plot Maps
      • Things To Keep In Mind
      • Section Review
    • Getting Tones
      • Vocals
      • Drums and Percussion
      • Electric Bass
      • Guitar Cabinet
      • Acoustic Guitar
      • Keyboards
      • Then What?
      • Section Review
    • Efficient Tracking Techniques
      • Take Recording
      • Comping Takes
      • Track Stacks
      • Overdubs
      • Section Review
  • Professional Behavior
  • Troubleshooting